Dear Self

Dear Self,

As easy as it is to say, you need to get your head back in the game. You’ve played the same game before, with GCSE’s. You’ve won the dance battle of revision before- you can and need to do it again. If I’m honest with you, you revision effort and focus is only half, or less, than what it was last year. You’ve missed the bigger picture. Despite knowing it, you forgot that A levels are SO much more important than GCSE’s; your A level game should be a step up- not a step down. With three months to go, now is the prime time to level up your revision. Start with your time management; use your time more valuably.

My “new term resolution” is to thoroughly revise quotes during registration time and before school. What’s your “new term resolution”?

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Surviving A levels

My jump to A levels wasn’t as smooth as I had expected. I didn’t think it could possibly be as demanding as ab-day or leg-day. I knew that it would be challenging; I knew exactly how challenging it would be, but I convinced myself that I was ready to put my armour on and battle through it. I met with my first defeat within the first day: myself versus English literature.

I thought that I was ready to take on the demands of A levels. I expected to walk in to my lessons, on a bright, early autumnal day, as confident as I was in my GCSE exams- it was raining.

Little did I know that A levels was a whole new game, and I had only started to train for it. Regardless of whether or not you got outstanding GCSE grades, this game isn’t about talent, it’s all about strategy and patience. 

When you start A levels, you aren’t going to know everything. Like myself, you may think that you are only building on existing skills- while this thought is somewhat true, most lessons are crammed with new concepts and new content.

The mass of information that you have to absorb in each lesson is as heavy as the mass of the universe, but it doesn’t have to feel like this. Don’t be so hard on yourself. The key to surviving A levels is in balance and patience.

Don’t stop everything else in your life in an effort to learn an unrealistically great chunk of your course. Balance your time between consistent revision and consolidation and vital leisure time for yourself.

Non-stop studying is not good for you. It’s mentally draining. It’s dangerous. It’s deadly. It’s okay if you don’t understand everything straight away, afterall, you’re still on the first lap of A levels. You just need to keep on swimming.